The Juvenile Justice Professional's Guide to
Human Subjects Protection and the IRB Process
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Privacy Protections
Human Subjects Research
Ethical Principles of the Belmont Report
The Institutional Review Board (IRB)
Protecting Human Subjects from Harm
The Consent Process
Privacy Protections
HIPPA
FERPA
PPRA
Related Laws

Message:

Human subjects are protected by laws and policies that regulate what and how private information is collected, maintained, and disclosed.

Implication:
Juvenile justice professionals must uphold regulations and implement procedures that protect youth privacy, particularly when the juvenile justice system, schools, and human service organizations share information.

In addition to the Common Rule, the rights and welfare of juveniles are protected through other Federal privacy laws, state statutes, and local regulations. These laws regulate the dissemination of juvenile offender information by the courts, juvenile justice organizations, schools, and other youth-related programs. Laws that govern youth privacy issues in each state can include, but are not limited to, police records, both legal and social history juvenile court records, mental health records, youth-related programs and support services records, mental health case files, and school records. Juvenile justice professionals should be aware that policies regulating dissemination of juvenile court record information vary widely among states.

While the general trend is for juvenile court records to be more open to the public, the majority of states have qualifying restrictions, such as age and offense, relative to public release of youth records. Some states permit youth-serving agencies access to juvenile court records through a court order from a juvenile court judge. Additionally, some state laws limit interagency information sharing, while others require local youth agencies to share information.

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